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Chinese (Mormon) Apricot Tree

The Chinese Mormon Apricot, also known as a Sweet pit or Sweet Kernel Apricot, has a very limited history, but the era that it comes into popularity may reflect on why. It begins with the Gold Rush in California and ends up at Promontory Summit, Utah Territory with the driving of the Golden Spike to join the Transcontinental Railroad. The Apricot kernels have long been used in Chinese medicine to treat colds, coughs and stomach ailments. It also traces back to the Hunza population, using the sweet pit Apricots for eating and Bitter pits varieties for oils used in cooking and lighting. Cold hardy and widely adapted the Chinese Mormon Apricot has become very popular in cold country selection doing well where other apricot varieties fail. Good flavor and texture along with heavy production are all common features of this variety. Self-fruitful but can benefit from adding another variety to pollinate.
As low as $49.99
Item #8014.
Availability: In stock

We do not ship to AK, HI, US territorries, Canada or Mexico. We can not ship citrus to TX, AZ or FL.

USDA ZONES: 5-9 Outdoors
 
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Is This Plant Self Pollinating?

Chinese (Mormon) Apricot Tree is self-fertile, but the fruit crop will be larger if the tree is planted with a second tree.

Description

Prunus armeniaca 'chinese mormon'

The Chinese Mormon Apricot, also known as a Sweet pit or Sweet Kernel Apricot, has a very limited history, but the era that it comes into popularity may reflect on why. It begins with the Gold Rush in California and ends up at Promontory Summit, Utah Territory with the driving of the Golden Spike to join the Transcontinental Railroad. The Apricot kernels have long been used in Chinese medicine to treat colds, coughs and stomach ailments. It also traces back to the Hunza population, using the sweet pit Apricots for eating and Bitter pits varieties for oils used in cooking and lighting. Although more recent research has cautioned against the use of the bitter pit Apricots for health purposes. This is due to the highly lethal chemical compound amygdalin and the difficulty in determining dosage. The Sweet pits selections are very low in amygdalin and not toxic. Cold hardy and widely adapted the Chinese Mormon Apricot has become very popular in cold country selection doing well where other apricot varieties fail. Good flavor and texture along with heavy production are all common features of this variety. Self-fruitful but can benefit from adding another variety to pollinate. Try the Golden Sweet as a pollinating partner. Late blooming helps to beat the cold weather, good for areas with late spring frosts. Ripens in early July
Characteristics
Fruit Color:
Pale Orange
Ripens:
June - July
Sun/Shade:
Full Sun
Water Needs:
regular water
Soil Type:
well-draining
Soil pH Level:
pH of 6.5
Tree Size:

15' height with 15' spread

Beautiful shape, can be held to any size below 10 feet for easy care.
Years to Bear:
3
Pollination:
Requires Pollenizer
Bloom Color:
Cold Hardy:
to -10° F
Primary USDA Zone Range:
5 - 9
Secondary USDA Zone Range:
N/A
Chill Hours:
700 - 800
Size & Spacing

15' height with 15' spread

Beautiful shape, can be held to any size below 10 feet for easy care.

8 to 10 Feet on Center, can be held to any size with summer pruning

Planting & Care

Apricots are adaptable to most soil types, but do best in well drained, loamy soils. Mulching helps retain moisture, keep roots cool in the hot summer and helps to stabilize the soil temperature. Apply mulch 3 to 4 inches deep and 3 to 4 feet outside the canopy. In poor draining soils consider mounding or raised beds to 12 to 18 inches high Most fruit trees are pruned during their dormant phase in Winter, but apricots do best when pruned in Summer. Pruning should be done in July and August after harvest. Apricot trees explode with fragrant white blossoms in early Spring and grow quickly to become a wide canopy shade tree, so they are attractive in landscaping. The trees can live for up to 75 years

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